How Film Is Delivered To Theatres

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Opps!  This isn’t really the way to have your films delivered:

This unfortunate vehicle lost it’s brakes & crashed thru the auditorium

wall, into a Torrington, Connecticut theatre a few years ago…

 

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After over 100 years, the 35mm film era is ending.  The majority of movie theatres World-wide have

already converted to digital presentation (D-Cinema).  With the obsolescence of film, Boston Film Transport Co.

(mentioned below) has gone out of business. The Harbor Theatre ran a successful fund-raising campaign in 2012

and will convert to digital projection asap: currently expected to be delivered and installed in May 2013 – 

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We book our films on Mondays along with the rest of the theatres in America, for a Friday opening.  There are only five studios

plus independent distributors, so we are at their mercy when it comes to booking film. Our goal is to stay away from unnecessary

violence and gore, to present films to entertain and educate.  The studios take 35% to 68% of each movie ticket dollar as rental.

A two-hour 35mm release print is almost two miles long.  It weighs 50-60 pounds and arrives usually via the Technicolor Corporation

(they used to make extremely stable and beautiful color prints), or by The Boston Film Transport Company. The Video Loft (tell them

The Harbor Theatre sent you) accepts our UPS film deliveries during the day, and Boston Film Transport has a copy of the theatre’s key.

They drive from theatre to theatre, across New England overnight, Thursday to Friday, picking up and delivering film, as they have

been doing since the 1930s.

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